The Strongest and Hardest Metals in the World

The Strongest and Hardest Metals in the World

Here is a list of the strongest and hardest metals in the world, in no particular order.

  • Steel is probably the strongest alloy. In its base form, steel is a combination of iron and carbon, both of which are common elements found in the Earth’s crust. It can be mixed with other metals to make it even stronger. It’s used to make everything from cutlery to skyscrapers. Some of the countries that make steel are Turkey, Brazil, Ukraine, Germany, and South Korea.
  • Tungsten is probably the strongest pure metal. Ranked as the 19th most abundant element on Earth, tungsten is often combined with steel and other elements to create hard alloys. The alloys produced are often used in electrical and military applications. Tungsten is formed in minerals like scheelite, wolframite, huebnertie, and ferberite which can be found in China, South Korea, Bolivia, Great Britain, Russia, and Portugal.
  • Iridium belongs to the platinum family. Pure iridium is very rare on Earth because there are only two parts in a billion that are in the crust. It’s a by-product of copper or nickel mining. It’s known to be hard and brittle. It’s also the most corrosion resistant element. Ores containing iridium are found in Brazil, the United States, Myanmar, South Africa, Russia and Australia.
  • Titanium is also deemed as one of the strongest pure metals. It’s the ninth most abundant metal in the Earth’s crust. It’s stronger than steel, yet lighter. It’s ideal for industrial and aerospace applications. Ores containing titanium are found in Australia, Scandinavia, North America, the Urals, Malaysia and Paraguay.
  • Chromium ranks as the 22nd most abundant element on Earth. It has high corrosion-resistance and hardness. It’s often added to alloys to make them harder. Chromium is found in chromite ore which is found in Zimbabwe, Russia, New Zealand, Turkey, Finland, Philippines, and Madagascar.
  • Osmium, another member of the platinum family, is rarer than iridium. Despite its rarity, this metal has few uses. Osmium is a by-product of nickel mining and is found in platinum-bearing river sands in the Urals, North America, and South America.